Monday, December 2, 2013

Daaaaaamn AT&T snitching

9.2.2013, 04:13 PM

AT&T helps DEA track suspected drug dealers with phone call data

Edouard H.R. Gluck/ASSOCIATED PRESS

‘Subpoenaing drug dealers’ phone records is a bread-and-butter tactic in the course of criminal investigations,’ said Brian Fallon, a spokesman for the Department of Justice.

The feds have partnered with AT&T to reach out and touch alleged drug dealers.

The phone company has been helping the Drug Enforcement Agency’s “Hemisphere Project” by providing easy access to its massive database, which contains 26 years of information and tracks 4 billion calls a day, records show.

The government also pays AT&T to embed employees alongside DEA agents and investigators in locations around the country.

The employees can quickly supply the investigators with subpoenaed phone data and help them track down dealers, the report said, adding that the project has been highly successful in following suspects who frequently switch cellphones.

Some of the subpoenas are issued by the DEA itself — it’s one of a handful of government agencies that can issue its own “administrative subpoenas.”



But AT&T since I'm not drug dealing on my data plan can y'all stop throttling my service if I'm on LTE all day why my phone so slow?


@1Entrepronegro

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Monday, December 2, 2013

Daaaaaamn AT&T snitching

9.2.2013, 04:13 PM

AT&T helps DEA track suspected drug dealers with phone call data

Edouard H.R. Gluck/ASSOCIATED PRESS

‘Subpoenaing drug dealers’ phone records is a bread-and-butter tactic in the course of criminal investigations,’ said Brian Fallon, a spokesman for the Department of Justice.

The feds have partnered with AT&T to reach out and touch alleged drug dealers.

The phone company has been helping the Drug Enforcement Agency’s “Hemisphere Project” by providing easy access to its massive database, which contains 26 years of information and tracks 4 billion calls a day, records show.

The government also pays AT&T to embed employees alongside DEA agents and investigators in locations around the country.

The employees can quickly supply the investigators with subpoenaed phone data and help them track down dealers, the report said, adding that the project has been highly successful in following suspects who frequently switch cellphones.

Some of the subpoenas are issued by the DEA itself — it’s one of a handful of government agencies that can issue its own “administrative subpoenas.”



But AT&T since I'm not drug dealing on my data plan can y'all stop throttling my service if I'm on LTE all day why my phone so slow?


@1Entrepronegro

No comments: